[VIDEO] If some celestial bodies were closer to us


ph1-3_1024

For 25 years now, the Hubble Space Telescope (and many other satellites) has stimulated us with numerous jaw dropping images of space—stretching from the Great Nebula of Orion, to the Whirlpool Galaxy. They all look so huge and comprehensive, you can nearly imagine yourself moving through space, looking directly at them from up close—yet even the closest among them are unfathomably far away (the closest planet is nearly 162 million miles/261 million kilometers from sun, while the closest star is over 4 light-years distant). In a recent video, the Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos, to be exact) visualizes how our sky may look if some of these marvels were in nearer proximity to Earth. Watch the video below:

Advertisements

Our star is five billion years younger than most in the Milky Way


19091-milky-way-above-the-canyon-1680x1050-nature-wallpaper

Our sun is nearly 4.5 billion years — which means it missed the charming initial years of the Milky Way galaxy. If you were standing on a planet nearly about 10 billion years ago, when the Milky Way was pretty young, the night sky would have appeared very different. The image below is an artist’s impression of the night sky on a planet in a relatively young Milky Way-type galaxy, the way our galaxy was 10 billion years ago. You can see “the sky are ablaze with star birth. Pink clouds of gas harbor newborn stars, and bluish-white, young star clusters litter the landscape,” as NASA explains.

hs-2015-11_web

Image Credit: NASA/ESA/Z. Levay (STScI)

A recent study of young galaxies like our own demonstrates that as these galaxies slow down creating stars, they also stop developing as quickly in general. Which is quite logical. NASA explains:

“Astronomers don’t have baby pictures of our Milky Way’s formative years to trace the history of stellar growth so they studied galaxies similar in mass to our Milky Way, found in deep surveys of the universe. The farther into the universe astronomers look, the further back in time they are seeing, because starlight from long ago is just arriving at Earth now. From those surveys, stretching back in time more than 10 billion years, researchers assembled an album of images containing nearly 2,000 snapshots of Milky Way-like galaxies. The new census provides the most complete picture yet of how galaxies like the Milky Way grew over the past 10 billion years into today’s majestic spiral galaxies. The multi-wavelength study spans ultraviolet to far-infrared light, combining observations from NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory, and ground-based telescopes, including the Magellan Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.”

vyzdlj7bg5w9jovxq77g

Above is a selection of Hubble Space Telescope photos, displaying how galaxies similar to our own developed over time.

Source : Physics-astronomy

Here is a tour of No Man’s Sky’s mathematically generated incredible universe


nomansskyinterview-1

When released this year, this amazing new next-gen sci-fi video game, “No Man’s Sky”, will cover about 18 quintillion visit-able planets and it would take about five billion years to visit each of those planets — no breaks allowed.  This is quite a remarkable concept, even if we’ll only get to see a little portion of what No Man’s Sky is set to offer. Presently in development by self-governing UK-based studio, Hello Games, the simulated landscape is procedurally created by an algorithmic programming system that sorts what Hello Games creator, Sean Murray, tells Game Informer in the video below is “a series of very simple formulae laid on top of each other to create something quite complex”.

What this allows for is unbelievable detail and limitless material to discover; zero loading time; and nearly no content kept on a disc, your PC or PS4 console, or even in the cloud. For people among us who have been a little underwhelmed with what next generation consoles, the Playstation 4 and XBox One, have so far provided, this amazing game is well and accurately taking benefit of their exceptional processing power to make something remarkable. Watch the video linked above by Game Informer to perceive exactly how this game is being created. I must say, after learning about this game, I think 2015 is going to be a worthy year for gaming.

Source: Kotaku, Game Informer

Hubble spots massive ‘eye in the sky’


Follow us on Google+ , Twitter and Facebook

1415397667007_wps_8_p1444aw_jpg

It might look like a giant eye in the sky, or something from a science fiction fiction film, but in fact this incredible image reveals just how violent planet formation is.

Captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, it shows the huge dusty debris discs around stars.

Created by collisions between leftover objects from planet formation, were imaged around stars as young as 10 million years old and as mature as more than 1 billion years old in Nasa’s images.

The researchers discovered that no two “disks” of material surrounding stars look the same.

“We find that the systems are not simply flat with uniform surfaces,” Schneider said.

Source: dailymail