Moon Experiences Quake Just Like Earthquake


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As the earthquake is still an unsolved mystery for the scientists, by adding another, an Indian scientist has discovered that moon also feels tremors and quakes like earth.

The discovery is made by India’s first lunar probe Chandrayaan-1 as the scientist has revealed that when the tectonic plates of moon collide, causes Quakes just like earthquake.

The plates make up the crust and upper surface and when it collide together, it causes moon-quake.

The discovery is noted out by Saumitra Mukherjee, a Professor of Geology and Remote Sensing at the School of Environmental Sciences in Jawaharlal Nehru University and a student of the university Priyadarshini Singh.

The images providing clues to the occurrence of quakes on the Moon, were captured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera and Narrow Angle camera aboard Chandrayaan-1.

The images depict South Polar region of the Moon and spews clue on the presence of tectonic plates which when move can cause quakes similar to earthquakes, explained study authors.

Launched in 2008, the main aim of the Chandrayaan-1 was to make a 3-dimentsional model of the Moon and mapping of chemical composition on its surface.

The discovery will help the researchers as they may be able to predict quakes on the Moon going ahead, by analyzing tectonic plate movements on the Moon and comparing them with earthquakes.

Source : ISRO

You can soon bury your DNA on Moon!


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A British space consultant will charge people 50 pounds or so to place a sample of their DNA in an archive to be buried on the Moon. Called Lunar Mission One, the archive is the brainchild of David Iron, who has worked on Skynet, the UK spy satellite network, and Galileo, the European Union’s global positioning system. He will offer people a chance to place a sample of their DNA, in the form of a strand of hair, in an archive to be buried on the Moon, alongside a digital history of as much of their lives as they want to record.

However, Iron needs at least 10 million people to do this if he is to generate the 500 million pounds the moon shot will need, ‘New Scientist’ reported.

Iron and his colleagues have launched a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter to raise the initial 600,000 pounds of seed funding needed to set up the company to commission designs for the spacecraft, which it is hoped will blast off in 2024. Iron is working with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Harwell, UK.Lunar Mission One plans to land a robotic spacecraft on the Moon’s south pole. It will then drill at least 20 metres into the lunar crust, extracting core samples to be analysed on the craft. “No lunar or planetary mission of any kind has ever drilled to a significant depth below the surface. The deepest Apollo drill core was only 3 metres long,” said Ian Crawford at Birkbeck College, London, Lunar Mission One’s chief planetary scientist.

“The drill will enable the geothermal gradient, and thus lunar heatflow, to be measured for the first time,” Crawford said.

After about six months, capsules containing the DNA and digital data will be injected into the borehole, which will then be sealed.

Source : Deccan herald

Lunar Mission One aims to take Moon exploration to new depths


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Another private space exploration venture is under way with the British-led Lunar Mission One announcing plans to send an unmanned robotic landing module to the South Pole of the Moon. Initially funded by a Kickstarter campaign, the non-profit organization hopes to drill ten times deeper into the lunar surface than has ever previously been attempted and use the borehole to store a giant digital time capsule of human knowledge.

Under development for about eight years, the UK-based Lunar Mission One had its public launching this week at the the Royal Society’s 12th Reinventing Space Conference in London. The effort was founded as Lunar Mission Ltd by former Royal Navy Engineering Officer David Iron, and is partnered with the University College of London and the Open University among others. Its goal is to develop and land a probe at the Lunar South Pole by 2024 as part of an effort to not only gather more knowledge about the Moon, but also to promote public interest in space exploration and develop new means of funding future missions without government support.

Continue reading Lunar Mission One aims to take Moon exploration to new depths

3D-printed moonbase? ESA suggested future moon colony


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The European Space Agency (ESA) has proven that its project to 3D-print a base on the Moon is possible. In a latest video the agency shows how 3D-printing robots may be used to build the base using lunar material.

The ESA started investigation of the lunar base possibility in 2013, working alongside its industrial and architectural partners. The creation of the reliable semi-spherical structures on the surface of the moon could be fulfilled within the next 40 years, and 90 percent of the materials needed would be derived from the moon itself.

latest details of the new concept, which is, however, still “firmly on the drawing board,” were discussed at a conference this week at ESA’s technical center in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

Continue reading 3D-printed moonbase? ESA suggested future moon colony

China’s Lunar Test Spacecraft Takes Incredible Picture of Earth and Moon Together


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The Chinese lunar test mission Chang’e 5T1 has sent back some amazing and unique views of the Moon’s far side, with the Earth joining in for a cameo in the image above. According to the crew at UnmannedSpaceflight.com the images were taken with the spacecraft’s solar array monitoring camera.

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A closeup of Mare Marginis, a lunar sea that lies on the very edge of the lunar nearside. Credit: Xinhua News, via UnmannedSpacefight.com

The mission launched on October 23 and is taking an eight-day roundtrip flight around the Moon and is now journeying back to Earth. The mission is a test run for Chang’e-5, China’s fourth lunar probe that aims to gather samples from the Moon’s surface, currently set for 2017. Chang’e 5T1 will return to Earth on October 31.

The test flight orbit had a perigee of 209 kilometers and reached an apogee of about 380,000 kilometers, swinging halfway around the Moon, but did not enter lunar orbit.

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A view of Earth on October 24, 2014, from the Chinese Chang’e-5 T1 spacecraft.

Source : universe today

To the moon and back: Lunar mission tests China’s space program


China launched an experimental spacecraft early Friday that is scheduled to orbit the moon before returning to Earth, a first for the country’s ambitious space program and considered a precursor to a planned mission to the moon.

The unmanned spacecraft was launched by a Long March 3C rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan, western China, state media said.

It is China’s first lunar module capable of returning to Earth and the mission’s main technical challenge will be making sure the spacecraft slows down enough to re-enter Earth’s atmosphere safely.

Too fast and it could overheat or become difficult to track and control, Hu Hao, chief designer of the lunar exploration program, told The China Daily.

It is expected to take around a week to fly around the moon. The spacecraft will end its mission by landing on the grasslands of Inner Mongolia.

The mission tests technology that will be used in a more ambitious launch, scheduled to take place in 2017, when an unmanned lunar probe will go to the moon, collect soil samples and return home.

Chinese astronauts have made five manned space flights on a series of Shenzhou “Divine Vessel” modules, with the latest mission in 2013 completing a successful manual docking with the Tiangong-1 space station.

Last December, China put a lunar rover — known as the Jade Rabbit — on the moon but it has been plagued by mechanical troubles, the China Daily said.

On course for the moon?

Joan Johnson-Freese, a professor at the U.S. Naval War College, said the lunar orbiter marks a step forward in the capabilities needed for a potential manned lunar program, which while under discussion hasn’t been officially approved yet.

“It’s significance is not only in demonstration of technical abilities, but in a continued political will to achieve its space goals over long periods of time — which is what China has that the U.S. currently lacks.”

While the United States has pulled back its space program, other countries are trying to match or surpass China’s accomplishments in what some observers have called an Asian space race.

In September, India became the first Asian country to send an orbiter around Mars.

Political symbolism

China sent its first astronaut into space in 2003 and has made rapid advances in the intervening decade.

Despite this, its space program is still yet to achieve capabilities reached by the U.S. and then Soviet Union decades ago, says James A. Lewis, director and senior fellow at the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies.

With little economic or military advantage, its value, he says, lies in how the space program shapes China’s perception of itself — a conspicuous display of national power and wealth that asserts China’s return to confidence and authority.

“We could ask if China is following an outdated recipe for superpower status,” he writes in a blog for the University of Nottingham in the UK.

“In terms of the global effect of the manned program, there might be some truth to this. But for the domestic audience that is the chief concern of China’s leaders, the space program produces invaluable results.”